Meet Purple Sunbird – The Impressive Creature With A Shining Coat Of Metallic Blue And Purple

Birds never let us down with their stunning appearance. Besides colorful species, most people also have a deep affinity for critters with a glittering look. That’s why you will find it hard to put your eyes off the glorious purple sunbird.

Source: Imran Shah / CC BY-SA 2.0

This species is also known by the scientific name Cinnyris asiaticus. It is only 10-centimeter long with a square-ended tail. The male stands out with brilliant metallic blue and purple plumage, darker on the upper parts, and dark brown wings. Its purple-back under part makes the bird look like its cousin, the Lotens Sunbirds. The male individuals will display their yellow pectoral tufts during the mating season to attract partners.

Source: J.M.Garg / CC BY-SA 3.0

Like many other birds, the female purple sunbird looks much duller with olive-brown feathers above a yellowish breast and belly. There are also pale supercilia above their eyes. Male individuals have the same appearance as females until they become mature.

Source: Mike Prince / CC BY 2.0

This beautiful species is native to thin forests and garden land in South and Southeast Asia. Sometimes they can be found in western parts of the Arabian peninsula.

Source: J.M.Garg / CC BY-SA 3.0

Generally, purple sunbirds feed on nectar, but they also eat insects and small berries occasionally.

Source: Hari K Patibanda / CC BY 2.0

In the breeding season, the male displays a unique dance by raising his head, fanning his tail, and exposing his pectoral tufts. The performance is associated with a song to draw females’ attention.

Source: Vijay Sonar / CC BY 2.0

The female takes charge of collecting cobwebs, thin strips, and barks to form a nest. The male also supports from time to time during the building process. The female often lays 2 eggs, which will hatch after 15 to 17 days of incubation. The couple will both find food for their babies.

Source: Imran Shah / CC BY-SA 2.0

Astoundingly, sunbirds can live about 22 years in captivity.

Source: Imran Shah / CC BY-SA 2.0

Fortunately, the bird population hasn’t declined to an alarming level, so it is in the group of the Least Concern on the Red List.

Source: Hari K Patibanda / CC BY 2.0

Have you ever seen this incredible little bird in real life? Do you know any bird that has a similar appearance to the purple sunbirds? If you want to share various birds you’ve ever seen, feel free to leave comments in the section below!

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